This article covers the Art form of sculpting, I personally like the style and the presentational detail that it depicts, through intricate elements. I will be covering the various sculpting styles from across the many regions such as Prehistoric time, Ancient Egypt, Rome and Renaissance.

“The history of the sculpture is varied and is illustrative of how sculpture has changed extensively over the ages. The art of sculpture continues as a vital art form worldwide. From pre-historic and ancient civilizations to the contemporary, from the utilitarian and religious to Modernist abstraction, and conceptual manifestations of both form and content, a continuous stream of creativity & an extremely modest show of compassion.

Sculpture has been central in religious devotion in many cultures, and until recent centuries large sculptures, too expensive for private individuals to create, were usually an expression of religion or politics. Those cultures whose sculptures have survived in quantities include the cultures of the Ancient Mediterranean, India and China, as well as many in South America and Africa (Douglas, 2010).”

The many cultures that has left their mark through time, I think shows a sense of timeless generosity. By the way they express their sculpting skills based on their cultural methods, gives a strong sense of artistic creativity.

Egyptian

“Ancient Egyptian art is five thousand years old. It emerged and took shape in the ancient Egypt, the civilization of the Nile Valley. Expressed in paintings and sculptures, it was highly symbolic and fascinating – this art form revolves round the past and was intended to keep history alive.

From 3000 B.C Symbolism also played an important role in establishing a sense of order. Symbolism, ranging from the Pharaoh’s regalia (symbolizing his power to maintain order) to the individual symbols of Egyptian gods and goddesses, was omnipresent in Egyptian art. Animals were usually also highly symbolic figures in Egyptian art (Manley, 2010).”

I have always had a huge fascination with Egyptian culture, because above most other cultures I find theirs to be bold and artistic, as well as firm and elegant in a specific and unique manner. Also I like the idea of how they shape their surroundings with illustrations of historical backgrounds based on their culture and heritage. One of the features that I particularly have found interesting about the Egyptian culture is how they had lack of machinery or high-tech technology, yet they were able to build structures and booby traps that was just as complex.

Greek

“Around 480-323 B.C the form of classical sculpture became fluid and natural and the stylization of the archaic art gave way to realistic figures which emanated the illusion of moving through space. For the first time in human history, human anatomy was deemed worthy of being immortalized in stone or bronze, and the humble and laborious forward step of the kouros statues was replaced by poses that commanded their space with effortless movement. During the classical period the Greek artists replaced the stiff vertical figures of the archaic period with three-dimensional snap shots of figures in action (Boardman, 2010).”

I have always found Greek sculptures to be very strong in appearance and perpetuated highly chiselled structures, through using simple basic methods. Through their way of projecting the human body in such confidence, I think it opened a more realistic style to the art form of sculpting and gave a new in sight as to how we observe the human. As more then just an organic form, but also as a symbol of artistic creativity and cultural dominance. Where they show pride in the complexity and versatility of their work.

Roman

“Ancient Roman sculpture is generally regarded as being a mass produced copy of Greek sculpture but this is quite clearly an over simplification.

The earliest innovations of “classical” sculpture had already been adopted by the Etruscans who traded with the Greek colonies of southern Italy, well before Ancient Rome was a city to be reckoned with.

At the basis of Greek sculpture we can find a journey of growing consciousness of the individual and his place within the world about him.”

“The application of proportion to the human figure (and to architecture also) is a well known achievement but we shouldn’t forget the debt owed to the Egyptians before them who likewise applied predefined proportions to their pyramids and sculptures.”

I have always had a huge fascination with Egyptian culture, because above most other cultures I find theirs to be bold and artistic, as well as firm and elegant in a specific and unique manner. Also I like the idea of how they shape their surroundings with illustrations of historical backgrounds based on their culture and heritage. One of the features that I particularly have found interesting about the Egyptian culture is how they had lack of machinery or high-tech technology, yet they were able to build structures and booby traps that was just as complex.

 

Greek

“Around 480-323 B.C the form of classical sculpture became fluid and natural and the stylization of the archaic art gave way to realistic figures which emanated the illusion of moving through space. For the first time in human history, human anatomy was deemed worthy of being immortalized in stone or bronze, and the humble and laborious forward step of the kouros statues was replaced by poses that commanded their space with effortless movement. During the classical period the Greek artists replaced the stiff vertical figures of the archaic period with three-dimensional snap shots of figures in action (Boardman, 2010).”

“Ancient Greek Sculpture”

 

 

I have always found Greek sculptures to be very strong in appearance and perpetuated highly chiselled structures, through using simple basic methods. Through their way of projecting the human body in such confidence, I think it opened a more realistic style to the art form of sculpting and gave a new in sight as to how we observe the human. As more then just an organic form, but also as a symbol of artistic creativity and cultural dominance. Where they show pride in the complexity and versatility of their work.

 

Roman

“Ancient Roman sculpture is generally regarded as being a mass produced copy of Greek sculpture but this is quite clearly an over simplification.

The earliest innovations of “classical” sculpture had already been adopted by the Etruscans who traded with the Greek colonies of southern Italy, well before Ancient Rome was a city to be reckoned with.

At the basis of Greek sculpture we can find a journey of growing consciousness of the individual and his place within the world about him.”

 

“The application of proportion to the human figure (and to architecture also) is a well known achievement but we shouldn’t forget the debt owed to the Egyptians before them who likewise applied predefined proportions to their pyramids and sculptures.”

 

“Roman Sculpture”

From the research that I have collected regarding the style origins of the roman culture, the sculpting was originally used from Greek structures. Also both Roman and Greek sculptures, grew from the Egyptian style of sculpting. What I find interesting, is even though all three cultures are strongly independent, it seems that the three civilizations are linked all the way from Egyptian influence. “Roman sculpture initially copied much from Greek sculpture just as Greeks had originally copied from late Egyptians (Wikipedia, 2010).”

Bibliography

Wikipedia. Bailey Douglass. 2010. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_sculpture

Crystalinks. Bill Manley. 2010. http://www.crystalinks.com/egyptart.html

Greek Landscapes. John Boardman. 2010. http://www.greeklandscapes.com/greece/athens_museum_classical.html

Marian Milani. Giovanni Milani-Santarpia. 2010. 

http://www.mariamilani.com/ancient_rome/Ancient_Roman_Sculpture.htm

Wikipedia. Gerhard Koeppel.

 2010. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_sculpture

Image1&2. Sabob. 2010. http://www.sabob.com/products/Egyptian_Assyrian_replica_Sculpture_ancient_Bull_Wall_New.html

Image3. Ebay. 2010. cgi.ebay.com.au/…/300378564657

Image4. Majestic Dragonfly. 2010.  http://www.majesticdragonfly.com/mdstore/images/uploads/1307_large.jpq.jpg

Image5. Great Mirror. Flying Mountain. 2009. http://www.greatmirror.com/images/medium/003122.jpg

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